4/29/2012 This Way Out

 

Program #1,256

Hosted by Greg Gordon and produced with Lucia Chappelle

"NewsWrap": The Budapest Metropolitan Court overrules last week's police ban on the planned July 7th Pride parade in the Hungarian capital city; a report by Russia's state-owned news agency about proposed legislation to ban so-called "gay propaganda" reveals that 94 percent of survey respondents say they've never been exposed to it, but 86 percent approve of a ban on positive portrayals of same-gender relationships; the U.K. man sentenced to 3 years in prison in Dubai last week for having public gay sex tells the "Scottish Sun" that in reality "it was just a kiss and a cuddle" and that he plans to appeal; Saudi Arabia bans what it calls "gays and tom-boys" from attending government schools and universities, while the "Don't Say Gay" bill in the U.S. state of Tennessee to ban any discussion of human sexuality in elementary and middle schools other than heterosexuality wins narrow approval in a House committee, while a similar measure is introduced in the Missouri legislature, but the 17th annual National Day of Silence against anti-LGBT bullying is observed on more than 8 thousand U.S. school campuses; Israel's Conservative Jewish movement decides to open its rabbinical seminary to gay and lesbian students, but the Vatican demands reform of a leading organization of U.S. nuns whose "radical feminist themes" challenge Church doctrine, while outspoken anti-equality Archbishop J. Peter Sartain, who's charged with spurring those reforms, is rebuffed by six Seattle parishes who reject his call to participate in signature gathering efforts to qualify a petition for the November ballot to repeal the state's recently-enacted law opening civil marriage to same-gender couples; and veteran Anglican priest Paul Oestreicher is sure to upset conservative Christians of all denominations by writing in Britain's "Guardian" newspaper that Jesus and his disciple John were "what we today call gay" (written by GREG GORDON with thanks to REX WOCKNER, produced by STEVE PRIDE, and reported this week by MICHAEL LEBEAU and MISS BARBIE-Q

There couldn’t be a clearer contrast on the issue of LGBT rights between President Barack Obama and his presumed Republican challenger Mitt Romney. Obama has disappointed some equality advocates for not being the "fierce advocate" for LGBT rights that he promised during his first presidential campaign, but they’ll still applaud him for the significant progress that’s been made since he took office. Romney, on the other hand, opposes any pro-LGBT legislation, and has said as president he would have opposed the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell. Obama is famously "evolving" on civil marriage equality, but he’s facing increasing pressure to declare his support for the freedom to marry because it could be a plank in his party’s platform this year. Supportive LOS ANGELES MAYOR ANTONIO VILLARAIGOSA, who’ll be chairing the Democratic National Convention, discussed the issue on MSNBC’s "The Rachel Maddow Show" www.msnbc.com

At one time it seemed like the death penalty was just around the corner for UGANDA's gays and lesbians, and the world was up in arms. Then there was a reprieve. Now the infamous ANTI-HOMOSEXUALITY BILL is back with some modifications, but it would still impose lengthy jail terms for same-gender sex and any kind of advocacy for LGBT rights. CNN International's Christiane Amanpour tried to press PRESIDENT YOWERI MUSEVENI on the subject during an April 19th interview, but the beleaguered head of state insisted that LGBT Ugandans were in no danger. www.cnninternational.com

HELEN BRANSON was a straight woman who operated a LOS ANGELES gay bar in the 1950s — probably America's most anti-gay decade. Though at the time California statutes prohibited homosexuals from gathering in bars, Helen's place was remarkably safe from police raids and other anti-homosexual hazards. In 1957 Branson published her extraordinary memoir "Gay Bar", which may have been the first book by a heterosexual to depict the lives of homosexuals with admiration, respect, and love. In a 2010 edition with the expanded title of "GAY BAR: THE FABULOUS, TRUE STORY OF A DARING WOMAN AND HER BOYS IN THE 1950s", historian WILL FELLOWS interweaves Branson's chapters with his own insightful commentary, and excerpts from letters and essays appearing in gay publications of the period. He shares some of those insights with "This Way Out's" STEVE PRIDE


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April 29, 2012

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