February 2014 MinneCulture Archives

2/5/2014 MinneCulture

The sustainability of the Minnesota music scene
Produced by Allegra Oxborough

Year after year, the Twin Cities earns national attention for its talented songwriters. Not only is Minnesota home to a vibrant live music scene, but an academic one as well—with 37 accredited music schools in our state. But the way we consume music is rapidly changing. Streaming services like Spotify and Rdio provide access to millions of songs without having to buy a hard copy, or even download tracks.

So how does technology and a changing music business affect the sustainability of our local music scene? KFAI producer Allegra Oxborough decided to find out. She asked musicians how they are adapting, and finding new revenue models to survive.

2/12/2014 MinneCulture

Dora Zaidenweber at Transfer of Memory
Produced by Tom Garneau

Earlier this year, KFAI, the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas and Bethel University partnered to present a special community engagement forum around Transfer of Memory photo exhibit of Holocaust survivors by David Sherman.

On January 22, a special reception was held at Bethel, featuring survivor Dora Zaidenweber. Ms. Zaidenweber recounted stories from her family history and discussed translating her father’s memoir, “Sky Tinged Red,” from Yiddish to English.

The event was part of What’s in the Mix—a series of community engagement forums made possible by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. It was recorded and produced for broadcast by Tom Garneau, and airs Wed, February 12, at 7:30pm, on MinneCulture.

Transfer of Memory is a traveling exhibit. It will be on display at the Otter Tail Historical Society in Fergus Falls, Minnesota, from February 18 through March 28.

2/19/2014 MinneCulture

Celebrating the Rondo neighborhood
Produced by Allison Herrera
Production assistance by Stuart Rosen

St. Paul’s oldest African-American neighborhood is named after French Canadian fur trader Joseph Rondeau. After the civil war and during the reconstruction period in the south, many African Americans sought a better life and moved north. Some arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota, where jobs in the railroad and lumber industries were plentiful. Starting a new life on Rondo Avenue, residents became entrepreneurs, opening businesses and catering to the local community. Bonds were formed and friendships developed. A tight-knit neighborhood of people committed to education and opportunity evolved. Families looked out for one another.

Then in the 1960s, construction of Interstate 94 divided Rondo—shattering the community and displacing thousands of African Americans into a racially segregated city and discriminatory housing market. It radically changed the landscape, and erased a now-legendary neighborhood. Rondo still exists and its persistence and growth are celebrated through events like Rondo Days and the Jazz Festival. This audio documentary was produced by Allison Herrera with production assistance by Stuart Rosen.

2/26/2014 MinneCulture

Peggy’s Dreams: Living life with Down syndrome
Produced by Marisa Helms

Peggy Mehen wants to make some changes in her life. She wants a new job. She wants to live independently. And her biggest dream is to be a supermodel. The fact that Peggy is a 40 year-old woman with Down syndrome has little impact on what she believes she can achieve. As a child growing up in the 1970s and ’80s, Peggy belongs to a first generation of children with Down syndrome to be mainstreamed into schools—paving the way for today’s generation of parents and people with Down syndrome who continue to push boundaries and demand greater inclusion and better social and medical supports in the community.

Peggy’s Dreams: Living life with Down syndrome, was produced by Marisa Helms (marisahelms.com). Producer’s Note: The 1952 educational film heard in my story, In Our Care: Woodward State Hospital and School, is part of a 13-week series of documentaries about Iowa’s state institutions. The entire In our Care series is archived online at the Minnesota Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities website (mn.gov/mnddc).