May 2013 MinneCulture Archives

This week on MinneCulture, producer Britt Aamodt explores The Mesabi Iron Range Strike of 1907. At the turn of the last century, Minnesota’s Iron Range was a cauldron of ethnicities and languages. From 1892 to 1914, more than 40 different ethnic groups immigrated there from the Old World, converging on one of the richest iron lodes in history.

In 1907, a large-scale labor strike erupted on the Mesabi Range, led primarily by immigrant Finns. The strike raised questions about whether laborers had the right to strike for liveable wages, eight-hour work days and fair work practices.

Though ultimately unsuccessful, the strike broke down cultural barriers and united miners under the common banner of organized labor. In our next segment, KFAI producer Britt Aamodt talks with historian Rhoda Gilman, Pam Brunfelt and Peter Rachleff.

The Hip Hop Against Homophobia series began in 2009 to showcase dynamic talent and unite diverse communities. In this edition of MinneCulture, artists explore culture and social justice through music and poetry at a HHAH performance recorded at Patrick’s Cabaret this edition of MinneCulture, artists explore culture and social justice through music and poetry at a HHAH performance recorded at.This segment features MCs See More Perspective, Koaz and Desdamona, along with poet Amy Renaud and deejay Saul Goode. Produced for KFAI by Daniel Zamzow.

The Hip Hop Against Homophobia series began in 2009 to showcase dynamic talent and unite diverse communities. In this edition of MinneCulture, artists explore culture and social justice through music and poetry at a HHAH performance recorded at Patrick’s Cabaret this edition of MinneCulture, artists explore culture and social justice through music and poetry at a HHAH performance recorded at.This segment features MCs See More Perspective, Koaz and Desdamona, along with poet Amy Renaud and deejay Saul Goode. Produced for KFAI by Daniel Zamzow.

Since 1986, the Dakota Valley Symphony has performed concerts in parks, churches, schools, community centers and other public buildings throughout the south metro area. The organization was created to provide opportunities for skilled volunteer musicians to perform diverse music of all periods. The group also provides a forum for aspiring local composers to premiere their work. The symphony is comprised of a 60-member orchestra, a 40-member mixed chorus and a 90-member Summer Pops orchestra and chorus, all under the direction of founder and musical director Stephen J. Ramsey. This concert was produced for KFAI by Daniel Zamzow.

Since 1986, the Dakota Valley Symphony has performed concerts in parks, churches, schools, community centers and other public buildings throughout the south metro area. The organization was created to provide opportunities for skilled volunteer musicians to perform diverse music of all periods. The group also provides a forum for aspiring local composers to premiere their work. The symphony is comprised of a 60-member orchestra, a 40-member mixed chorus and a 90-member Summer Pops orchestra and chorus, all under the direction of founder and musical director Stephen J. Ramsey. This concert was produced for KFAI by Daniel Zamzow.

Xonxaro Baro’s Gypsy Love Show

Xonxaro Baro means “the great trick.” This live performance of the Gypsy Love Show at Amsterdam Bar and Hall features music by the Bourgeoisie Bohemians—Balkan and Gypsy performers with a touch of French circus—with storytelling by Tansy Undercrypt. Also included are three recordings by Gypsy Mania from their self-titled release, including “Butterfly,” “East Hennepin” and “Blues de Paris.” Gypsy Mania is Glen Helgeson (guitar), Gary Schulte (violin), Reynold Philipsek (guitar/vocals), Jeff Brueske (acoustic bass), Michael Bissonnette (percussion) and James Allen (guitar). Produced for KFAI by Daniel Zamzow and Nancy Sartor.

Xonxaro Baro’s Gypsy Love Show

Xonxaro Baro means “the great trick.” This live performance of the Gypsy Love Show at Amsterdam Bar and Hall features music by the Bourgeoisie Bohemians—Balkan and Gypsy performers with a touch of French circus—with storytelling by Tansy Undercrypt. Also included are three recordings by Gypsy Mania from their self-titled release, including “Butterfly,” “East Hennepin” and “Blues de Paris.” Gypsy Mania is Glen Helgeson (guitar), Gary Schulte (violin), Reynold Philipsek (guitar/vocals), Jeff Brueske (acoustic bass), Michael Bissonnette (percussion) and James Allen (guitar). Produced for KFAI by Daniel Zamzow and Nancy Sartor.

West Hills State School: A troubled past for the Owatonna orphanage

KFAI producer Dan Greenwood received a Page One Award from the Minnesota chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists for this audio documentary. In it, he tells the story of the State-Run School for Dependent and Neglected Children, which opened in Owatonna, Minnesota in 1886.

For nearly 60 years the orphanage housed thousands of children, and during the Great Depression, was massively overcrowded. For some, the orphanage provided a safe haven, but for many others, beatings and neglect were commonplace. In this documentary, Greenwood talks with Harvey Ronglien—a former state-schooler who spent his entire childhood at the orphange—to learn about the dark and sordid past of the institution.

Since the 1990s, Harvey and his wife Maxine have worked with the city to create a museum honoring the children who lived there. Today the campus at West Hills is on the National Registry as a Historic District. For more information, visit orphanagemuseum.com.

West Hills State School: A troubled past for the Owatonna orphanage

KFAI producer Dan Greenwood received a Page One Award from the Minnesota chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists for this audio documentary. In it, he tells the story of the State-Run School for Dependent and Neglected Children, which opened in Owatonna, Minnesota in 1886.

For nearly 60 years the orphanage housed thousands of children, and during the Great Depression, was massively overcrowded. For some, the orphanage provided a safe haven, but for many others, beatings and neglect were commonplace. In this documentary, Greenwood talks with Harvey Ronglien—a former state-schooler who spent his entire childhood at the orphange—to learn about the dark and sordid past of the institution.

Since the 1990s, Harvey and his wife Maxine have worked with the city to create a museum honoring the children who lived there. Today the campus at West Hills is on the National Registry as a Historic District. For more information, visit orphanagemuseum.com.