August 2012 MinneCulture Archives

8/1/2012 MinneCulture

Perpich Center for Arts Education concert
Produced by Daniel Zamzow

MinneCulture features a special concert recorded at the Perpich Center for Arts Education. The student-organized ensembles perform original compositions and songs, including:
Super Raccoon Bat!
D’Arcy Spiller (solo)
!00%Groovetrain
Tea-Tum

8/6/2012 MinneCulture

Crankshaft & the Gear Grinders perform at Harriet Brewing’s Tap Room. Produced by Daniel Zamzow. For more information on Crankshaft, visit his website

8/8/2012 MinneCulture

Coldwater Spring/Mini Owe Sni
Produced by Allison Herrera

Some people believe that Coldwater Spring has been flowing for more than 10,000 years. Located south of Minnehaha Park on the former Bureau of Mines Campus, and formerly known as Camp Coldwater, the spring provided fresh drinking water to the soldiers who built Fort Snelling. A civilian settlement sprang up, and fur traders, blacksmiths and the state’s first Indian agent all settled and lived among military personnel. Coldwater Spring sits near some of the most sacred Dakota sites: Wita Tanka, Pike Island, where Dakota buried there dead; Taku Wakan Tipi, Carvers Cave near the VA hospital, the dwelling place of Native American gods and spirits; and B’dote, the confluence of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers, where the first Dakota emerged. In 2010 the National Park Service took over the land at Coldwater Spring with the intention of making it a public park. Controversy ensued among Dakota people and environmental activists, who believe the site is sacred and worthy of protection under the National Register of Historic Places. KFAI producer Allison Herrera explores the complicated history of Coldwater Spring in this exclusive MinneCulture documentary.

8/13/2012 MinneCulture

Aliens in the Heartland: Clifford D. Simak and the Emergence of Pastoral Science Fiction
Produced by Brit Aamodt

Clifford D. Simak is part of Science Fiction’s Golden Age (1940s-50s), and the author of classics including “City,” “Way Station” and “Goblin Reservation.” He began his career in 1931 with the publication of “The World of the Red Sun” in Wonder Stories, a popular pulp magazine of the time. (That story would inspire a young junior high student, Isaac Asimov, to later try his hand at writing fiction.) Simak’s career spanned 50 years, and his prolific body of work included more than 100 stories and nearly 30 novels. He won three Hugo awards and one Nebula, and in 1977 was recognized by his peers as a Grand Master of Science Fiction—at the time, only the third author to receive such accolades. Through all the success and acclaim, Simak remained a small-town Wisconsin boy at heart, and maintained his reporter job at the Minneapolis Star newspaper. His Midwestern roots defined his fiction, in which regular folk in common settings confronted extraordinary circumstances—time paradoxes, immortals, aliens and parallel universes. Born in rural southwestern Wisconsin in 1904, Cifford Simak died of leukemia in Minneapolis in April 1988.

8/15/2012 MinneCulture

The Great Falls: St. Anthony Falls
Produced by Dixie Treichel

The Great Falls, dubbed “St Anthony Falls” by Father Louis Hennepin, evolved during the Ice Age and became the birthplace of Minneapolis. A spiritual place for Native Americans, and especially Dakota people, the Falls have always been a magnet for their beauty and power. European settlers harnessed the water power for lumber and flour mill industries that developed along the banks of the Mississippi, but years of over-use marred the landscape. Today St. Anthony Falls are part of the Mississippi River Historic District. KFAI’s Dixie Treichel produced this documentary for MinneCulture.

8/20/2012 MinneCulture

Charlotte Ouisconsin Clark Van Cleve
Produced by Bobbie Scott

Charlotte Ouisconsin Clark Van Cleve was a remarkable woman who left a legacy in Minnesota. A newborn Charlotte arrived here in 1819, when her father landed with the Fifth Infantry to construct Fort Snelling. Spending her formative years at remote military posts instilled in Charlotte a love of the flag, and throughout her life she exemplified strong patriotism and an altruistic nature. She raised a large family, and after the Civil War, founded Bethany Home—a safe-haven for “fallen” girls and women. Charlotte served tirelessly as the president of Bethany Home for more than twenty years, often taking unpopular stands in support of those she called her “girls.” Despite her sometimes controversial opinions, Charlotte was a beloved and respected member of the community throughout her long life. This MinneCulture documentary was produced by Bobbie Scott, with production assistance by Nancy Sartor. Special thanks to Sabrina Crews, Lisa Day, Ron Grogg, Christine and Jeff Nordin, and the Historic Fort Snelling Fife and Drum Corps.

8/22/2012 MinneCulture

Patty & the Buttons at the Red Stag Supperclub
Produced by Tom Garneau

Patty and the Buttons formed in 2008 when accordionist/vocalist Patrick “Patty” Harison returned to the Midwest. Inspired by his travels and work Panorama Jazz Band, Loose Marbles and the Baby Soda Jazz Band, he formed the Buttons to continue his love of hot rhythm and happy feet. The band’s eclectic repertoire includes New Orleans Traditional Jazz, Western Swing, Gypsy Melodies, Dust Bowl Ballads, Jug Music and 1930’s Popular Song. The core instrumentation of accordion, clarinet, guitar and bass is light and swift, but also beautifully melancholy and lush. Known as an accordionist, Patty doubles as the bands vocalist, with a vocal style that has been described as “Tom Waits meets Rudy Vallee.” This show was produced for KFAI by Tom Garneau.

8/27/2012 MinneCulture

A Clash of Cultures: Understanding the 1862 Dakota War
Produced by Milt & Jamie Lee (for AMPERS)

On August 17, 1862 a group of four young Dakota men on a hunting expedition killed five settlers who lived along the Minnesota river in what is now southwest Minnesota…and a war began. This week marks the 50th anniversary of this historical conflict. A Clash of Cultures: The 1862 Dakota War is a production of ampers-Diverse Radio for Minnesota Communities. Join ampers stations across Minnesota for this 60 minute documentary and more.

8/29/2012 MinneCulture

A Clash of Cultures: Understanding the 1862 Dakota War Clash of Cultures: Understanding the 1862 Dakota War
Produced by Milt & Jamie Lee (for AMPERS)

On August 17, 1862 a group of four young Dakota men on a hunting expedition killed five settlers who lived along the Minnesota river in what is now southwest Minnesota…and a war began. This week marks the 50th anniversary of this historical conflict. A Clash of Cultures: The 1862 Dakota War is a production of ampers-Diverse Radio for Minnesota Communities. Join ampers stations across Minnesota for this 60 minute documentary and more.
Produced by Milt & Jamie Lee (for AMPERS)

On August 17, 1862 a group of four young Dakota men on a hunting expedition killed five settlers who lived along the Minnesota river in what is now southwest Minnesota…and a war began. This week marks the 50th anniversary of this historical conflict. A Clash of Cultures: The 1862 Dakota War is a production of ampers-Diverse Radio for Minnesota Communities. Join ampers stations across Minnesota for this 60 minute documentary and more.