Recent News

  • "Community Radio" means you!

  • The In the Heart of the Beast Theater in South Minneapolis is known for some pretty wild performances involving giant puppets, so if any theater company was going to dramatize the creatures living in our basements and under our beds…this is what it might sound like. 

  • We often hear stories about the educational disparities between students who are white and students who are not white. Right now Minnesota students of color are not only far behind their white peers, but are graduating at some of the lowest rates in the country. 

  • Join Laura Waterman Wittstock on FIRST PERSON RADIO Wednesday, March 9, 2016 as she talks with Lee Ann Tall Bear, Mdewankton/Sisseton Dakota and Arapaho.We’ll talk about her exceptional career, her children and some long battles as a descendant of His Red Nation (Little Crow) to gain greater recognition and respect for this great Dakota leader. She is pictured here with Mike Greeley and Della Eastman, direct decendents of His Red Nation.
     
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  • There will be a special meeting of the Fresh Air Board of Directors on Wednesday, March 9th, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will take place in Studio 5 at Fresh Air Radio, 1808 Riverside Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55454.

  • Every year, KFAI celebrated International Women's Day with special programming. Beginning at midnight this coming Tuesday, March 8th, tune in for 24 hours of programming made by local women! See the schedule below for a list of programs. And if you miss any of the programs, be sure to find them in the archive any day before March 22nd, 2016.

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  • The Mixed Blood Theatre is just a block or two away from our KFAI world headquarters, and it has a new production opening Friday, March 4 – the show is called DJ Latinidad’s Latino Dance Party. It appears to be something between a performace and … a dance party. Sara Lopez is part of the Mixed Blood’s Latino Advisory Council, and Jack Reuler is the theater’s artistic director. They spoke with Paul Brohaugh on the Thursday Morning Blend.

  • Health Notes will be in conversation with teacher, mentor and founder of WE WIN Institute Titilayo Bediako.

    Titilayo Bediako was born and raised in Minnesota, and is the daughter of civil rights leader Matthew Little. She is instrumental in using African and African American history
    to African American youth through WE WIN Institute ( a non-profit organization dedicated to the academic and social success of all children)

    Titilayo says participating in African rituals helps give African-American youth a sense that they belong to something larger than themselves or their surroundings.
    She says that’s something she never received when she was in school. After graduating from high school, she moved to Tennessee where she joined an African history study group. “The more I studied and the more I learned about myself, the more my given name, which was Michelle Little, didn’t fit the person I had become,” The name Titilayo is from the Yoruba of Nigeria. She says it means “everlasting happiness.” Bediako is from the Ashanti people of Ghana and it means, “born to struggle for her people.”
    Participating in African-rooted rituals and ceremonies, like Kwanzaa, is one way African-Americans nurture their African side. “So I get everlasting happiness in struggling for my people,”
    says Bediako. “The one thing that I’ve learned is that struggling for African people makes it possible to struggle for all people.”
    Many African-Americans have adopted African names. Despite attempts to identify with Africans, African-Americans carry the physical and emotional baggage of slavery and racism.
    Titilayo says many African-Americans have poor self-esteem because they were born in a country that historically has devalued their lives.
    This is an important conversation you will not want to miss.

    Health Notes Airs Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

  • In the fall of 1995, Lyndale school (Minneapolis Public School) teacher Titilayo (Titi) Bediako saw the need to build the youth of the future by celebrating and honoring cultural differences. WE WIN, which began with one program and 25 children, and has grown to include free parent groups, after school, tutoring, and summer programs, and Kwanzaa Celebrations each year and as of 2014, has served over 5000 youth and families, creating long-term and systemic change in their lives and communities.

    We Win students will share the history of African people on Health Notes to celebrate Black History Month

    Health Notes Airs Mondays – 6:30-7:30PM

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