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On this weeks True Brit!, host Simon Husbands welcomes the US born writer and teacher, podcaster and musicologist, also resident of Japan, Mr.Tim Young!

 

On this weeks True Brit!, host Simon Husbands welcomes the US born writer and teacher, podcaster and musicologist, also resident of Japan, Mr.Tim Young!

 

MinneCulture presents
The History of Rondo
Wed, Feb 19, 7:30pm

St. Paul’s oldest African-American neighborhood is named after French Canadian fur trader Joseph Rondeau. After the civil war and during the reconstruction period in the south, many African Americans sought a better life and moved north. Some arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota, where jobs in the railroad and lumber industries were plentiful.

Starting a new life on Rondo Avenue, residents became entrepreneurs, opening businesses and catering to the local community. Bonds were formed and frienships developed. A tight-knit neighborhood of people committed to education and opportunity evolved. Families looked out for one another.

Then in the 1960s, construction of Interstate 94 divided Rondo—shattering the community and displacing thousands of African Americans into a racially segregated city and discriminatory housing market. It radically changed the landscape, and erased a now-legendary neighborhood.

Rondo still exists and its persistence and growth are celebrated through events like Rondo Days and the Jazz Festival.

On Wednesday, Feb 19, at 7:30pm, MinneCulture presents an audio documentary on the History of Rondo, produced by Allison Herrera with assistance from Stuart Rosen. MinneCulture is made possible by a grant from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota History Center and Allison Herrera.

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St. Paul’s oldest African American neighborhood is named after French Canadian fur trader Joseph Rondeau. After the civil war and during the reconstruction period in the south, many African Americans sought a better life and moved north. Some arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota, where jobs in the railroad and lumber industries were plentiful.

Starting a new life on Rondo Avenue, residents were entrepreneurs, opening businesses and catering to the local community. Bonds were formed and frienships developed. A tight-knit neighborhood committed to education and opportunity evolved. Families cared for themselves and each other.

Then in the 1960s, construction of Interstate 94 divided Rondo—shattering the community and displacing thousands of African Americans into a racially segregated city and discriminatory housing market. The highway radically changed the landscape, and erased a now-legendary neighborhood.

Rondo still exists and its persistence and growth are celebrated through events like Rondo Days and the Jazz Festival.

KFAI producer Allison Herrera explores this legendary community in an audio documentary, The History of Rondo, airing Wed, Feb 19, at 7:30pm on MinneCulure.

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Born in 1931, Josie Robinson Johnson has played an active role in the civil rights movement since her teenage years, when she and her father canvassed her hometown of Houston to gather signatures on an anti-poll tax petition.

In the early 1960s, Johnson lobbied professionally for passage of bills concerning such issues as fair housing and employment opportunities. In 1964, she traveled from Minneapolis to Mississippi with an integrated group of women to witness and take part in the struggle there. After visiting an open-air freedom school where blacks were organizing, the group learned the school was bombed later that day. Johnson became a community organizer for Project ENABLE, a pioneering effort in developing parenting skills and strengthening family life in 1965. A member of the Minneapolis Urban League, she served as acting director between 1967 and 1968.

Johnson worked with elected officials many times over the years. In 1968, she became a legislative liaison and community liaison as a mayoral aide in Minneapolis during a time of trouble for African Americans in the town. The executive assistant to the lieutenant governor of Colorado from 1975 to 1978, Johnson went back to Texas in 1978 and supervised Judson Robinson’s campaign staff. In 1980, she served as deputy campaign manager for the Jimmy Carter presidential campaign in Tennessee.

Johnson has also had an ongoing relationship with the University of Minnesota. Between 1971 and 1973, she served on the University’s Board of Regents. She earned a B.A. in Sociology at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, and an M.A. and Ed.D. at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. The University of Minnesota offered her a senior fellowship in 1987. Johnson directed its All-University Forum as diversity director from 1990 to 1992. That year, she became responsible for minority affairs and diversity at the college as the associate vice president for academic affairs. The University of Minnesota established the annual Josie Robinson Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award in her honor.

Don’t miss this important conversation with this African American Icon. Health Notes Airs Mondays, 6:30-7:30pm

A few weeks ago, Alberto Monserrate announced he will step down from the Minneapolis School Board after serving one term. As a private citizen, Monserrate has balanced his public service with the demands of wide-ranging business interests – running a Latino-oriented media company that has expanded into advertising, public relations, and even fashion. Meanwhile, the Minneapolis schools face significant issues that include student achievement, assessment, funding, and equal treatment. Monserrate told KFAI’s Rico Morales that after chairing the board for two years he decided to spend this last year on the board focusing on the issues that led him to run for office in the first place.

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Born in 1931, Josie Robinson Johnson has played an active role in the civil rights movement since her teenage years, when she and her father canvassed her hometown of Houston to gather signatures on an anti-poll tax petition.

In the early 1960s, Johnson lobbied professionally for passage of bills concerning such issues as fair housing and employment opportunities. In 1964, she traveled from Minneapolis to Mississippi with an integrated group of women to witness and take part in the struggle there. After visiting an open-air freedom school where blacks were organizing, the group learned the school was bombed later that day. Johnson became a community organizer for Project ENABLE, a pioneering effort in developing parenting skills and strengthening family life in 1965. A member of the Minneapolis Urban League, she served as acting director between 1967 and 1968.

Johnson worked with elected officials many times over the years. In 1968, she became a legislative liaison and community liaison as a mayoral aide in Minneapolis during a time of trouble for African Americans in the town. The executive assistant to the lieutenant governor of Colorado from 1975 to 1978, Johnson went back to Texas in 1978 and supervised Judson Robinson’s campaign staff. In 1980, she served as deputy campaign manager for the Jimmy Carter presidential campaign in Tennessee.

Johnson has also had an ongoing relationship with the University of Minnesota. Between 1971 and 1973, she served on the University’s Board of Regents. She earned a B.A. in Sociology at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, and an M.A. and Ed.D. at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. The University of Minnesota offered her a senior fellowship in 1987. Johnson directed its All-University Forum as diversity director from 1990 to 1992. That year, she became responsible for minority affairs and diversity at the college as the associate vice president for academic affairs. The University of Minnesota established the annual Josie Robinson Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award in her honor.

Don’t miss this important conversation with this African American Icon. Health Notes Airs Mondays, 6:30-7:30pm

Shez Cassim is a Minnesotan who spent most of 2013 in a prison in the United Arab Emirates. His nine-month ordeal began when U.A.E. authorities took offense to a satiric video he posted on You Tube. Cassim’s jailers would not tell him why he was imprisoned. His release came only after he was convicted of defaming the country, sentenced to a year in prison and given credit for time served.
KFAI’s Christina Cerruti talked with Shez Cassim in Minneapolis, and filed this report.

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Each week, KFAI’s Cinema Shanty considers a current film that will screen in the Twin Cities. Join Kathie Smith and John Moret as they discuss the most engaging and provocative cinema being produced today. This week, they talk about a Sebastián Lelio film called “Gloria”.

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The Twin Cities are part of a national effort to eradicate homelessness among veterans sometime during the next two years. Eleven state agencies are working to get to this goal ahead of similar efforts in other participating cities in Ohio and Iowa.
KFAI recently talked with two leaders in Minnesota’s campaign to address this issue – Mikkel Beckmen of Heading Home Hennepin and Cathy ten Broeke, the State Director to Prevent and End Homelessness. ten Broeke talked with KFAI’s Diksha Maurya who asked about the inter-city competition to see to it that our veterans do not live on the street.

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