General News

  • Shez Cassim is a Minnesotan who spent most of 2013 in a prison in the United Arab Emirates. His nine-month ordeal began when U.A.E. authorities took offense to a satiric video he posted on You Tube. Cassim’s jailers would not tell him why he was imprisoned. His release came only after he was convicted of defaming the country, sentenced to a year in prison and given credit for time served.
    KFAI’s Christina Cerruti talked with Shez Cassim in Minneapolis, and filed this report.

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  • Each week, KFAI’s Cinema Shanty considers a current film that will screen in the Twin Cities. Join Kathie Smith and John Moret as they discuss the most engaging and provocative cinema being produced today. This week, they talk about a Sebastián Lelio film called “Gloria”.

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  • The Twin Cities are part of a national effort to eradicate homelessness among veterans sometime during the next two years. Eleven state agencies are working to get to this goal ahead of similar efforts in other participating cities in Ohio and Iowa.
    KFAI recently talked with two leaders in Minnesota’s campaign to address this issue – Mikkel Beckmen of Heading Home Hennepin and Cathy ten Broeke, the State Director to Prevent and End Homelessness. ten Broeke talked with KFAI’s Diksha Maurya who asked about the inter-city competition to see to it that our veterans do not live on the street.

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  • An overnight musical marathon, protesting drone warfare, took place on the West Bank this past weekend. The effort was inspired by a comment last summer from Alan Sparhawk of the Duluth indie trio Low after his band filled an entire 27-minute set with one song. “Drone, not drones,” was Sparhawk’s explanation.
    The Drone Not Drones benefit raised money for Doctors Without Borders and gave musicians a chance to voice their opposition to the Obama Administration’s use of unmanned aircraft to kill terrorism suspects in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
    KFAI correspondent Ryan Dawes was on the scene and filed this report.

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  • Economic indicators suggest that there is a long-awaited recovery underway in key areas around our region, including housing and employment.
    Both government and private interests want the recovery to get stronger, but how best to make that happen is often at issue.
    One of the less-well-known players in this effort is a nonprofit organization called “Greater MSP”. Mostly funded by private companies, Greater MSP works to create a regional economic development strategy, to focus on job retention and expansion, and to market our region around the world. Michael Langley is the founding CEO of Greater MSP. He talked with KFAI’s Ron Thums.

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  • It’s not cold where we are going tonight on Jet Set Planet. That’s all you need to know. Join host Glen Leslie, and his co-host for the evening Steve Kyle, for 90 minutes of the best in Exotica to celebrate the middle of the coldest months we’ve seen in a long time around these parts. Steve brings in a pile of LPs from his personal collection as we do our best to keep the tiki torches burning bright, keeping us warm in the face of Old Man Winter and his damn sno-cone machine. You’ll hear from the famous Exotica practitioners as well as from the unknowns — with a handful of hacks thrown in for good measure. So bust out the rum for a night of summer, in the middle of winter – on Jet Set Planet, Friday Nights at 9 on KFAI.

  • An international group of researchers, including astronomers from the University of Minnesota, have launched a new “citizen science” project called Galaxy Zoo. The project allows anyone to become a cosmic explorer by looking for black holes in space. And yes, this is something you can do from the comfort of your own home.

    Lawrence Rudnick is a University of Minnesota Professor and an astrophysicist who studies large-scale structures in the Universe. He talked with KFAI’s John Helgeson, who asked the professor why black holes are important.

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  • Female-headed households in Minnesota are the most likely type of family configuration to be in poverty. And a persistent wage gap and “occupational clustering” contribute to the poverty that afflicts women and their families.

    These are some of the findings of a study of Women’s Economic Security in the state of Minnesota. The report is the work of the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota and the Center on Women and Public Policy at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School.

    Deb Fitzpatrick is director of the Center on Women and Public Policy. She talked with KFAI’s Paul Brohaugh on the Morning Blend.

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  • Year after year, the Twin Cities earns national attention for its talented songwriters. Not only is Minnesota home to a vibrant live music scene, but an academic one as well—with 37 accredited music schools in our state. But the way we consume music is rapidly changing. Streaming services like Spotify and Rdio provide access to millions of songs without having to buy a hard copy, or even download tracks. So how does technology and a changing music business affect the sustainability of our local music scene?

    This week MinneCulture explores how today’s local musicians are navigating the ever-changing landscape of the music business, in an audio documentary produced for KFAI by Allegra Oxborough. Tune in on Wednesday, February 5, at 7:30pm.

    Pictured top to bottom: Holly Newsome, Adam Levy, Caroline Smith, Lizzo.

    This project was made possible by a grant from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

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  • The United Nations has says well over 3 million people need food in the African nation of South Sudan. The world’s newest nation has been in crisis since the middle of December when violence broke out between rival factions – some loyal to the current president and others following his dismissed deputy.
    A fragile ceasefire was agreed to last week and a second round of peace talks is scheduled to start this Friday, even as some reports indicate the ceasefire has already been violated.
    The lull in fighting has allowed relief agencies to return to South Sudan’s capital, Juba. Among them is the Minnesota-based nonprofit, the American Refugee Committee. ARC works to help provide and improve health services. Representing ARC in Juba is Brian LeCuyer, who spoke with KFAI’s Christina Cerruti on the Morning Blend.

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