General News

The Minnesota Legislature is starting its every-other-year “short” session – a session that is smaller in terms of size but the potential is there for it to include a slew of favorite topics – – state spending, government regulation, sex crime, marijuana, and the minimum wage – all of it influenced by the enormous pull of election year politics.
Marty Owings, covers the state capitol for KFAI and posts regular updates online at MN Capitol News, and Hamline University professor David Schultz writes about politics on his blog, Schultz’s Take. They talked politics with KFAI’s Ron Thums on the Morning Blend.

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Out on a Limb Dance Company and school is a St. Paul based dance company with a twist. It’s a nonprofit organization with a mission to embrace the notion that dance should be within the reach of everybody – whether it’s the dancers on stage or the audience.
Kim Martinez is the artistic director for Out On A Limb.
She told KFAI’s Siobhan Kierans that dance has long been part of her family, handed down by her mother.

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Former Minnesota State Supreme Court Chief Justice Eric Magnuson, spoke with KFAI’s Rico Morales about a task force report on the Minnesota State Sex Offender Program. The task force report and a federal judge’s ruling have created a sense of urgency for the Minnesota Legislature to address the way Minnesota treats sex offenders who have completed their prison sentences, but are considered too dangerous to release.

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Each week, KFAI’s Cinema Shanty considers a current film that will screen in the Twin Cities. Join Peter Schilling and Kathie Smith as they discuss the most engaging and provocative cinema being produced today.
This week, Kathie and guest host John Moret talk about Tim’s Vermeer, a documentary about the techniques that may have been used by the Dutch master painter Johannes Vermeer to make his work appear so realistic.

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Qualifying high school students in Minnesota can earn college level credit through the state’s Postsecondary Enrollment Options program, also known as PSEO. Earning college credits before graduating from high school is one great way for Minnesota students and their families to save money on higher education.
In 2012 the law was expanded to cover more students. KFAI’s Abeni Hill spoke with Marisa Gustafson and Joe Nathan from the Center for School Change and they said word of that expansion has been slow to get out.

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On this weeks True Brit!, host Simon Husbands welcomes the US born writer and teacher, podcaster and musicologist, also resident of Japan, Mr.Tim Young!

 

MinneCulture presents
The History of Rondo
Wed, Feb 19, 7:30pm

St. Paul’s oldest African-American neighborhood is named after French Canadian fur trader Joseph Rondeau. After the civil war and during the reconstruction period in the south, many African Americans sought a better life and moved north. Some arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota, where jobs in the railroad and lumber industries were plentiful.

Starting a new life on Rondo Avenue, residents became entrepreneurs, opening businesses and catering to the local community. Bonds were formed and frienships developed. A tight-knit neighborhood of people committed to education and opportunity evolved. Families looked out for one another.

Then in the 1960s, construction of Interstate 94 divided Rondo—shattering the community and displacing thousands of African Americans into a racially segregated city and discriminatory housing market. It radically changed the landscape, and erased a now-legendary neighborhood.

Rondo still exists and its persistence and growth are celebrated through events like Rondo Days and the Jazz Festival.

On Wednesday, Feb 19, at 7:30pm, MinneCulture presents an audio documentary on the History of Rondo, produced by Allison Herrera with assistance from Stuart Rosen. MinneCulture is made possible by a grant from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota History Center and Allison Herrera.

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St. Paul’s oldest African American neighborhood is named after French Canadian fur trader Joseph Rondeau. After the civil war and during the reconstruction period in the south, many African Americans sought a better life and moved north. Some arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota, where jobs in the railroad and lumber industries were plentiful.

Starting a new life on Rondo Avenue, residents were entrepreneurs, opening businesses and catering to the local community. Bonds were formed and frienships developed. A tight-knit neighborhood committed to education and opportunity evolved. Families cared for themselves and each other.

Then in the 1960s, construction of Interstate 94 divided Rondo—shattering the community and displacing thousands of African Americans into a racially segregated city and discriminatory housing market. The highway radically changed the landscape, and erased a now-legendary neighborhood.

Rondo still exists and its persistence and growth are celebrated through events like Rondo Days and the Jazz Festival.

KFAI producer Allison Herrera explores this legendary community in an audio documentary, The History of Rondo, airing Wed, Feb 19, at 7:30pm on MinneCulure.

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A few weeks ago, Alberto Monserrate announced he will step down from the Minneapolis School Board after serving one term. As a private citizen, Monserrate has balanced his public service with the demands of wide-ranging business interests – running a Latino-oriented media company that has expanded into advertising, public relations, and even fashion. Meanwhile, the Minneapolis schools face significant issues that include student achievement, assessment, funding, and equal treatment. Monserrate told KFAI’s Rico Morales that after chairing the board for two years he decided to spend this last year on the board focusing on the issues that led him to run for office in the first place.

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Shez Cassim is a Minnesotan who spent most of 2013 in a prison in the United Arab Emirates. His nine-month ordeal began when U.A.E. authorities took offense to a satiric video he posted on You Tube. Cassim’s jailers would not tell him why he was imprisoned. His release came only after he was convicted of defaming the country, sentenced to a year in prison and given credit for time served.
KFAI’s Christina Cerruti talked with Shez Cassim in Minneapolis, and filed this report.

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