Culture & Community News

  • Often presenting itself after a head trauma, concussion— or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)— can cause anxiety, chronic migraines, depression, memory, and sleep problems that can last for years, referred to as post concussion syndrome (PCS). Easy-to-read and informative, this book is an invaluable resource for understanding concussion, post concussion syndrome (PCS) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), as well as overcoming the challenges associated with these conditions.
     
    Neuropsychologist and concussion survivor Dr. Diane Roberts Stoler is the authority on all aspects of the recovery process. Coping with Concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury is a lifeline for patients, parents, and other caregivers navigating the concussion course.

    Health Notes Airs Mondays 6:30-7:30pm

  • Jezebel’s sexual lasciviousness, Mammy’s devotion, and Sapphire’s outspoken anger—these are among the most persistent stereotypes that black women encounter in contemporary American life. Hurtful and dishonest, such representations force African American women to navigate a virtual crooked room that shames them and shapes their experiences as citizens. Many respond by assuming a mantle of strength that may convince others, and even themselves, that they do not need help. But as a result, the unique political issues of black women are often ignored and marginalized.

    Health Notes airs on Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

  • Health Notes will be in conversation with teacher, mentor and founder of WE WIN Institute Titilayo Bediako.

    Titilayo Bediako was born and raised in Minnesota, and is the daughter of civil rights leader Matthew Little. She is instrumental in using African and African American history
    to African American youth through WE WIN Institute ( a non-profit organization dedicated to the academic and social success of all children)

    Titilayo says participating in African rituals helps give African-American youth a sense that they belong to something larger than themselves or their surroundings.
    She says that’s something she never received when she was in school. After graduating from high school, she moved to Tennessee where she joined an African history study group. “The more I studied and the more I learned about myself, the more my given name, which was Michelle Little, didn’t fit the person I had become,” The name Titilayo is from the Yoruba of Nigeria. She says it means “everlasting happiness.” Bediako is from the Ashanti people of Ghana and it means, “born to struggle for her people.”
    Participating in African-rooted rituals and ceremonies, like Kwanzaa, is one way African-Americans nurture their African side. “So I get everlasting happiness in struggling for my people,” says Bediako. “The one thing that I’ve learned is that struggling for African people makes it possible to struggle for all people.”

    Many African-Americans have adopted African names. Despite attempts to identify with Africans, African-Americans carry the physical and emotional baggage of slavery and racism.
    Titilayo says many African-Americans have poor self-esteem because they were born in a country that historically has devalued their lives.
    This is an important conversation you will not want to miss.
    Health Notes airs Mondays 6:30-7:30pm

  • Remembering Matthew Little will be featured on Health Notes, Monday, Feb 20th at 6:30pm  and Tuesday during Black History Month programming at 1:00pm.

  • When Dawn Morningstar heard the Dalai Lama’s prediction—“The world will be saved by the Western woman”—her heart was immediately enlisted to help make his words come true. Her own painful beginning had set her on a quest to find ways for women (herself included) to lead fulfilling lives and, in turn, affect positive transformation in the world.

  • Have you wondered why some sixty-year-olds look and feel like forty-year-olds and why some forty-year-olds look and feel like sixty-year-olds? While many factors contribute to aging and illness, Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn discovered a biological indicator called telomerase, the enzyme that replenishes telomeres, which protect our genetic heritage. Dr. Blackburn and Dr. Elissa Epel’s research shows that the length and health of one’s telomeres are a biological underpinning of the long-hypothesized mind-body connection. They and other scientists have found that changes we can make to our daily habits can protect our telomeres and increase our health spans (the number of years we remain healthy, active, and disease-free).

    Health Notes Airs on Mondays – 6:30-7:30PM

  • Dr. Alicia Stanton explains the dietary, lifestyle, and environmental factors that contribute to hormone imbalances, what can be done to restore healthy hormone balance, and how to achieve greater overall health and wellness.
    Women today are experiencing the effects of fluctuations in multiple hormones, in addition to those associated with child bearing, and most of these changes are triggered by factors outside the female reproductive organs. That’s what most physicians don’t understand. Dr. Alicia Stanton has a special interest in hormone balance and its effect on menopausal symptoms, weight gain, PMS, energy levels and stress. Her experience also translates well to manage her male patients and their hormonal issues, including low testosterone, adrenal fatigue and low libido.

    Health Notes Airs Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

  • IT’S SHOWTIME! IT’S YOUR TIME SO LETS SOAR HIGH
    The world is undergoing an epochal shift. Humanity can move from surviving to thriving.
    both personally and professionally…Mary Regnier
    Health Notes airs Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

  • Dr. Chris Shade, an expert in the environmental and analytical chemistries of mercury, about how we get exposed to mercury, the affect it can have on our bodies, what determines sensitivity to mercury, and the right (and wrong) way to test for mercury toxicity.

    Health Notes Airs on Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

  • Belly Fat Blues
    Getting rid of your belly bulge is important for more than just vanity’s sake. Excess abdominal fat—particularly visceral fat, the kind that surrounds your organs and puffs your stomach into a “beer gut“—is a predictor of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and some cancers. If diet and exercise haven’t done much to reduce your pooch, then your hormones, your age, and other genetic factors may be the reason why.
    Health Notes airs on Mondays 6:30 -7:30PM

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