Culture & Community News

Now listen up, partner. The romance of the wild West continues to interest writers, movie buffs and music lovers more than 100 years after the fact.

From Women’s Health contributor and yoga expert Kathryn Budig—the essential, authoritative guide to yoga, for beginners and beyond.

Approximately 16 millions Americans now practice yoga on a regular basis. Devotees can’t rave enough about this ancient art of meditation, breathing, and physical postures that calms the mind and slims the body.

Unlike fitness fads, yoga is worth the hype. The postures stretch and tone lean muscle mass and sculpt a strong and slender physique—burning up to 400 calories in a 90-minute session. But yoga does something even better. It’s proven to reduce the biggest cause of weight gain—stress—which 43% of Americans say makes them overeat.

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As a former stripper, Erika Lyremark has seen it all: disrespectful club managers, cutthroat dancers, and a never-ending supply of sleazeballs. Don’t even mention the long hours in six-inch stilettos. Yet beneath the stigma of this enigmatic industry, Erika uncovered the secrets of success: Remove the safety net and embrace risk—victory will be yours. Ask for the dance, and an influx of new business will follow. Say yes to yourself, and you’ll inspire those around you to help your business grow.

Whether your goal is to build your business, increase your sales, or carry out your Red Carpet Dreams, Think Like A Stripper delivers the lessons you need to thrive as an entrepreneur, and the advice you’d never (ever, ever) learn in business school

.Health Notes Airs Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

On November 3, November 10 and November 17, KFAI airs three weeks of winners from the Third Coast International Audio Festival (the Sundance for Radio).

Thomas Frank, author of the bestseller, What’s the Matter with Kansas?, visits Write On! Radio on January 24th to talk about his new book, Pity the Billionaire. Frank will also discuss how the “Right” has managed to frame the debate about economic policy in a way that benefits the rich at the expense of everyone else.

Thursday, July 15, 9 AM on KFAI Radio’s Catalyst:politics & culture (NEW DAY.NEW TIME), we kick off a series of reports from the US SOCIAL FORUM (in June n Detroit). ELI MEYERHOFF, a U of MN grad student and activist, talks about a growing student movement for acess to college and upholding multicultural and ethnic studies.

Tune in to Catalyst:politics & culture at a new time THURSDAY July 8, 9 AM, to as Lydia Howell interviews Twin Cities Indigenous/Native American playwright, RHIANA YAZZIE, about her new play ADY (premiering JULY 9-25 at the Playwright’s Center in Minneapolis). Cast members will also perform excerpts from the play. Ms.

TUYNE in to KAI’s Art Matters Thur.May 6, 7pm tp hear artist-curators TINA and XAVIER TAVERA talk about the exhibition Independence & Revolution 1810/1910/2010 (through May 28) at Intermedia Arts, 2822 Lyndale Ave. S., Minneapolis. Live-sreaming & archived for 2 weeks after broadcast on the Art Matters page at http://www.kfai.org.

Health Notes will end its African History Month tribute by talking with teacher, mentor and founder of WE WIN Institute.

Titilayo Bediako was born and raised in Minnesota, and is the daughter of civil rights leader Matthew Little. She is instrumental in using African and African American history to African American youth through WE WIN Institute ( a non-profit organization dedicated to the academic and social success of all children)

Bediako says participating in African rituals helps give African-American youth a sense that they belong to something larger than themselves or their surroundings.

She says that’s something she never received when she was in school. After graduating from high school, she moved to Tennessee where she joined an African history study group. “The more I studied and the more I learned about myself, the more my given name, which was Michelle Little, didn’t fit the person I had become,” says Bediako.
The name Titilayo is from the Yoruba of Nigeria. She says it means “everlasting happiness.” Bediako is from the Ashanti people of Ghana and it means, “born to struggle for her people.”

Symbols of Kwanzaa, celebrated by African-Americans in December. Participating in African-rooted rituals and ceremonies, like Kwanzaa, is one way African-Americans nurture their African side. “So I get everlasting happiness in struggling for my people,” says Bediako. “The one thing that I’ve learned is that struggling for African people makes it possible to struggle for all people.”

Like Bediako, many African-Americans have adopted African names. However, despite attempts to identify with Africans, African-Americans carry the physical and emotional baggage of slavery and racism. Bediako says many African-Americans have poor self-esteem because they were born in a country that historically has devalued their lives.

.Health Notes Airs Mondays from 6:30-7:30PM

Week 2 of our Pledge Drive takes off like a rocket. Join hosts Britt Aamodt, Amanda Balagur, Michael Fischbein and Mike Stapp as they take to the air waves with more highlights from recent Wave Project shows. Great music, fun stories, interesting discussions: all provided by members of the community on KFAI’s public access program. What you’ll hear is out of this world!

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