Culture & Community News

Health Notes will be in conversation with teacher, mentor and founder of WE WIN Institute Titilayo Bediako.

Titilayo Bediako was born and raised in Minnesota, and is the daughter of civil rights leader Matthew Little. She is instrumental in using African and African American history
to African American youth through WE WIN Institute ( a non-profit organization dedicated to the academic and social success of all children)

Titilayo says participating in African rituals helps give African-American youth a sense that they belong to something larger than themselves or their surroundings.
She says that’s something she never received when she was in school. After graduating from high school, she moved to Tennessee where she joined an African history study group. “The more I studied and the more I learned about myself, the more my given name, which was Michelle Little, didn’t fit the person I had become,” The name Titilayo is from the Yoruba of Nigeria. She says it means “everlasting happiness.” Bediako is from the Ashanti people of Ghana and it means, “born to struggle for her people.”
Participating in African-rooted rituals and ceremonies, like Kwanzaa, is one way African-Americans nurture their African side. “So I get everlasting happiness in struggling for my people,” says Bediako. “The one thing that I’ve learned is that struggling for African people makes it possible to struggle for all people.”

Many African-Americans have adopted African names. Despite attempts to identify with Africans, African-Americans carry the physical and emotional baggage of slavery and racism.
Titilayo says many African-Americans have poor self-esteem because they were born in a country that historically has devalued their lives.
This is an important conversation you will not want to miss.

Health Notes Airs Mondays 7:00-8:00PM

One boat. Four women. Four directions, four histories: merging. parting. reuniting.What are the stories that heal us, as we dive into breathing deeply, loving fully, knowing honestly, and relating consciously? How do we connect to the threads of our cultural past, as we reweave the patterns of our selves and our world?

How many times have you heard someone say or have you yourself said, “If we could just get everyone to the table, we could solve this problem”? Marnita’s Table has taken that question seriously.
This amazing organization has brought together thousands of people for hundreds of focused conversations around a host of issues that matter to our everyday live
The one and only Marnita (CEO) and Training Mgr. Lauren Williams help us heal with their unique perspective of social interaction that includes “Everyone”.

Health Notes will be in conversation with teacher, mentor and founder of WE WIN Institute Titilayo Bediako.

Titilayo Bediako was born and raised in Minnesota, and is the daughter of civil rights leader Matthew Little. She is instrumental in using African and African American history
to African American youth through WE WIN Institute ( a non-profit organization dedicated to the academic and social success of all children)

Titilayo says participating in African rituals helps give African-American youth a sense that they belong to something larger than themselves or their surroundings.
She says that’s something she never received when she was in school. After graduating from high school, she moved to Tennessee where she joined an African history study group. “The more I studied and the more I learned about myself, the more my given name, which was Michelle Little, didn’t fit the person I had become,” The name Titilayo is from the Yoruba of Nigeria. She says it means “everlasting happiness.” Bediako is from the Ashanti people of Ghana and it means, “born to struggle for her people.”
Participating in African-rooted rituals and ceremonies, like Kwanzaa, is one way African-Americans nurture their African side. “So I get everlasting happiness in struggling for my people,” says Bediako. “The one thing that I’ve learned is that struggling for African people makes it possible to struggle for all people.”

Many African-Americans have adopted African names. Despite attempts to identify with Africans, African-Americans carry the physical and emotional baggage of slavery and racism.
Titilayo says many African-Americans have poor self-esteem because they were born in a country that historically has devalued their lives.
This is an important conversation you will not want to miss.
Health Notes airs Mondays 6:30-7:30pm

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