Culture & Community News

Caribbean born, gay singer/songwriter Nhojj talks about his new CD “Made to Love Him – Celebrating Love” and Rob Ainsley, Head of Music with the MN Opera discusses “The Dream of Valentino”, Dominick Argento’s opera about 1920’s film star Rudolph Valentino

Born in 1931, Josie Robinson Johnson has played an active role in the civil rights movement since her teenage years, when she and her father canvassed her hometown of Houston to gather signatures on an anti-poll tax petition.

In the early 1960s, Johnson lobbied professionally for passage of bills concerning such issues as fair housing and employment opportunities. In 1964, she traveled from Minneapolis to Mississippi with an integrated group of women to witness and take part in the struggle there. After visiting an open-air freedom school where blacks were organizing, the group learned the school was bombed later that day. Johnson became a community organizer for Project ENABLE, a pioneering effort in developing parenting skills and strengthening family life in 1965. A member of the Minneapolis Urban League, she served as acting director between 1967 and 1968.

Johnson worked with elected officials many times over the years. In 1968, she became a legislative liaison and community liaison as a mayoral aide in Minneapolis during a time of trouble for African Americans in the town. The executive assistant to the lieutenant governor of Colorado from 1975 to 1978, Johnson went back to Texas in 1978 and supervised Judson Robinson’s campaign staff. In 1980, she served as deputy campaign manager for the Jimmy Carter presidential campaign in Tennessee.

Johnson has also had an ongoing relationship with the University of Minnesota. Between 1971 and 1973, she served on the University’s Board of Regents. She earned a B.A. in Sociology at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, and an M.A. and Ed.D. at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. The University of Minnesota offered her a senior fellowship in 1987. Johnson directed its All-University Forum as diversity director from 1990 to 1992. That year, she became responsible for minority affairs and diversity at the college as the associate vice president for academic affairs. The University of Minnesota established the annual Josie Robinson Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award in her honor.

Don’t miss this important conversation with this African American Icon. Health Notes Airs Mondays, 6:30-7:30pm

Born in 1931, Josie Robinson Johnson has played an active role in the civil rights movement since her teenage years, when she and her father canvassed her hometown of Houston to gather signatures on an anti-poll tax petition.

In the early 1960s, Johnson lobbied professionally for passage of bills concerning such issues as fair housing and employment opportunities. In 1964, she traveled from Minneapolis to Mississippi with an integrated group of women to witness and take part in the struggle there. After visiting an open-air freedom school where blacks were organizing, the group learned the school was bombed later that day. Johnson became a community organizer for Project ENABLE, a pioneering effort in developing parenting skills and strengthening family life in 1965. A member of the Minneapolis Urban League, she served as acting director between 1967 and 1968.

Johnson worked with elected officials many times over the years. In 1968, she became a legislative liaison and community liaison as a mayoral aide in Minneapolis during a time of trouble for African Americans in the town. The executive assistant to the lieutenant governor of Colorado from 1975 to 1978, Johnson went back to Texas in 1978 and supervised Judson Robinson’s campaign staff. In 1980, she served as deputy campaign manager for the Jimmy Carter presidential campaign in Tennessee.

Johnson has also had an ongoing relationship with the University of Minnesota. Between 1971 and 1973, she served on the University’s Board of Regents. She earned a B.A. in Sociology at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, and an M.A. and Ed.D. at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. The University of Minnesota offered her a senior fellowship in 1987. Johnson directed its All-University Forum as diversity director from 1990 to 1992. That year, she became responsible for minority affairs and diversity at the college as the associate vice president for academic affairs. The University of Minnesota established the annual Josie Robinson Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award in her honor.

Don’t miss this important conversation with this African American Icon. Health Notes Airs Mondays, 6:30-7:30pm

Prof. Mahmoud El Kati talks about the legacy of Civil Rights Legend, Matthew Little, Nelson Mandela and Martin Martin Luther King Jr.

When you listen closely to Mahmoud El-Kati, a life-long educator and professor emeritus of history at Macalester College, you will hear one of the more nuanced and passionate voices working in anti-racism today. ”Race is not based in genetics,” El-Kati explains. “Race is a myth. Racism is a reality.

In this important conversation, Professor El Kati helps us to understand that our history is our humanity.

Byron Katie, founder of The Work, has one job: to teach people how to end their own suffering. As she guides people through the powerful process of inquiry she calls The Work, they find that their stressful beliefs—about life, other people, or themselves— radically shift and their lives are changed forever.

Katie will talk with Health Notes about The Work and how it relates to the work of Dr. Martin Luther King.

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Womenfolk will feature the top women's folk/acoustic CDs of 2013 on Tuesday, January 14th as voted by you! To cast your vote for your top picks of the past year, email womenfolkradio@gmail.com by Sunday, January 12th at 6 pm. Then tune in on Tuesday from 2-4 pm Central to hear your favorite albums and picks from DJs, critics and your favorite Womenfolk artists!

After his second “near death experience” Mas Sajady was given astonishingly healing and intuitive abilities. Connecting to a higher energy field has allowed him to channel and heal through the Pure Source with amazing results. Healings can be for your physical or emotional health, financial or spiritual well-being as well as for relationships of all kinds.

Mas does not have the power to heal. However, he is able to allow pure energy from a higher energy field to work through him to heal. Although his abilities have been compared to religious figures, the healings are not religious in anyway but spiritual. Mas works on all faiths and non-faiths.

As you listen to this interview, you will feel the healing energy.

Health Notes Airs Mondays, 6:30-7:30PM.

Robyn Cruze says, “I gave my soul to my eating disorder. I truly believed that I would die from my illness as so many do. I felt my hearts being tarnished by the dictates of it. I was sinking along with the dreams and purpose I once had. I was treading in the deep end of life with only my nostrils above the waterline. Like the caterpillar that never came out of its cocoon, I was lost in the darkness of isolation. Never to become the butterfly that God intended me to be, that is until recovery”.

Listen to this important conversation on Health Notes. Health Notes Airs Mondays, 6:30-7:30PM

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These times are difficult and confusing. The world seems in turmoil. Educator and counselor, Dick Larson provides information that helps explain our rapidly changing reality. He will help us to understand how the qualities of the New Age are impacting our lives and our world.

He directly challenges the millennial gloom and doom so prevalent now with a fresh new hypothesis: a message concerning the arrival of a great teacher who will inspire us to create a future of peace, justice and cooperation.

Health Notes airs on Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

Health Notes will air a two part series, Dec 9th and 16th with teacher Dick Larson.

These times are difficult and confusing. The world seems in turmoil. Educator and counselor, Dick Larson provides information that helps explain our rapidly changing reality. He will help us to understand how the qualities of the New Age are impacting our lives and our world.

He directly challenges the millennial gloom and doom so prevalent now with a fresh new hypotheisis: a message concerning the arrival of a great teacher who will inspire us to create a future of peace, justice and cooperation.

Health Notes Airs Mondays – 6:30-7:30PM

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