Culture & Community News

Thursday, January 29th at 11 am ground-breaking author Erica Jong talks with Write on Radio hosts Ian and Lynette about her newest book, a collection of poetry called Love Comes First.

Thursday, August 7th, Ann Rosenquist Fee, a writer of intimate literary fiction, talks on Write on Radio about her current stories and upcoming events.

KFAI will broadcast the Twin Cities’ Ethiopian New Year Celebration live from Matthews Park on Sunday, September 9th from 2:30-6pm.

Tune in to the Wave Project this Sunday at 6 p.m. as students from Opportunity High School in Minneapolis share their creativity and thoughts about being from East Africa, as well as living and learning in America. Hear their views on culture and hopes for new lives as they grow to become active citizens within their communities.

If you are unable to attend the forum today at Sabathani Communinty Center today, Saturday, September 19, 2009, KFAI Radio presents Facing Challenges and Creating Solutions, via webinar from 10:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. To join the webinar, click the link below.

1. Please join my meeting.
https://www.gotomeeting.com/join/117782738

2.

When Dawn Morningstar heard the Dalai Lama’s prediction—“The world will be saved by the Western woman”—her heart was immediately enlisted to help make his words come true. Her own painful beginning had set her on a quest to find ways for women (herself included) to lead fulfilling lives and, in turn, affect positive transformation in the world.

Health Notes will celebrate African History Month by talking with teacher, mentor and founder of WE WIN Institute, Titilayo Bediako. Titilayo was born and raised in Minnesota, and is the daughter of civil rights leader Matthew Little. She is instrumental in using African and African American history to African American youth through WE WIN Institute (a non-profit organization dedicated to the academic and social success of all children).

Health Notes airs Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

Remembering Matthew Little will be featured on Health Notes, Monday, Feb 20th at 6:30pm  and Tuesday during Black History Month programming at 1:00pm.

Health Notes will be in conversation with teacher, mentor and founder of WE WIN Institute Titilayo Bediako.

Titilayo Bediako was born and raised in Minnesota, and is the daughter of civil rights leader Matthew Little. She is instrumental in using African and African American history
to African American youth through WE WIN Institute ( a non-profit organization dedicated to the academic and social success of all children)

Titilayo says participating in African rituals helps give African-American youth a sense that they belong to something larger than themselves or their surroundings.
She says that’s something she never received when she was in school. After graduating from high school, she moved to Tennessee where she joined an African history study group. “The more I studied and the more I learned about myself, the more my given name, which was Michelle Little, didn’t fit the person I had become,” The name Titilayo is from the Yoruba of Nigeria. She says it means “everlasting happiness.” Bediako is from the Ashanti people of Ghana and it means, “born to struggle for her people.”
Participating in African-rooted rituals and ceremonies, like Kwanzaa, is one way African-Americans nurture their African side. “So I get everlasting happiness in struggling for my people,”
says Bediako. “The one thing that I’ve learned is that struggling for African people makes it possible to struggle for all people.”
Many African-Americans have adopted African names. Despite attempts to identify with Africans, African-Americans carry the physical and emotional baggage of slavery and racism.
Titilayo says many African-Americans have poor self-esteem because they were born in a country that historically has devalued their lives.
This is an important conversation you will not want to miss.

Health Notes Airs Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

Sugar Blues

It’s a prime ingredient in countless substances from cereal to soup, from cola to coffee. Consumed at the rate of one hundred pounds for every American every year, it’s as addictive as nicotine — and as poisonous. It’s sugar. And “Sugar Blues”, inspired by the crusade of Hollywood legend Gloria Swanson, is the classic, bestselling expose that unmasks our generation’s greatest medical killer and shows how a revitalizing, sugar-free diet can not only change lives, but quite possibly save them.

Health Notes Airs Mondays 6:30 – 7:30PM

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