Culture & Community News

Radical Remission: Surviving Cancer Against All Odds

.What do you call a cancer patient who tried conventional medicine to its fullest, but her doctors told her there was nothing more they could do — and yet she then managed to heal her cancer using alternative means? Doctors call this “spontaneous remission”; others call it a ‘miraculous healing.’ I call it ‘Radical Remission. In her groundbreaking and inspiring book, Radical Remission: Surviving Cancer Against All Odds, Dr. Kelly A. Turner, founder of the Radical Remission Project, uncovers nine factors that can lead to a spontaneous remission from cancer—even after conventional medicine has failed.

Health Notes Airs Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

DreamBirth® is a system of short, simple imagery exercises designed specifically for pregnancy and childbirth. DreamBirth® techniques are learned and practiced during pregnancy under the guidance of certified DreamBirth® practitioners. This is a method devised by psychologist and imagery teacher, Dr. Catherine Shainberg, to assist mothers, and their attendants, in finding the true richness and deep power within the birth process.

In the words of Dr. Shainberg,
“Imagery is the oldest language in the world. Pre-verbal, it communicates through pictures—and it is through these pictures that the outside world is reconstructed and displayed in our minds… Since ancient times, mystics and yogis have used images to change body temperature, heart beat, even mend broken bones. Olympic athletes use visualization to win gold medals. By creating specific images in our minds, we talk to our bodies. We can train them to respond to visual cues, enabling us to access our most hidden body functions. DreamBirth®, an imagery process uniquely geared to procreation, pregnancy, and birth gives the future mother access to this power, maximizing her body’s natural abilities to conceive, carry and give birth in perfect health. DreamBirth® optimizes women’s innate ability to give birth easily, naturally and triumphantly.“

Health Notes Airs Mondays – 6:30-7:30PM

If you are struggling with an emotional or physical health challenge, Free to Love, Free to Heal offers a unique, proven path to authentic healing. In this book, renowned mind-body physician and Chopra Center co-founder, David Simon, M.D., guides us in the five-step process that has helped thousands release their emotional pain, find freedom from the past, and reclaim happiness.

In Free to Love, Free to Heal, board-certified neurologist David Simon provides a systematic approach to identifying, mobilizing, and releasing the life-damaging beliefs and their corresponding physical imbalances that contribute to chronic pain, anxiety, obesity, insomnia, irritable bowel syndrome, depression, addictive behaviors, chronic fatigue, immune disorders, and many other psychological and physical health conditions.

Drawing upon the Eastern healing arts and modern science, Dr. Simon shows you how to identify and transform the core misunderstanding that inhibit your body’s natural healing response. If you are prepared to become an active partner in your own healing journey, the information within this book will help you heal your emotions and heal your body
Health Notes Airs Mondays – 6:30-7:30PM

Minnesota military veterans are invited to take part in an arts retreat as part of the Red Wing Community Veterans Project, all expenses paid. The Red Wing Arts Association shines a light on veterans this year in May and June; this retreat is part of that focus. Veterans of all ages will have a chance to explore art in a variety of genres at the Villa Maria Retreat and Conference Center May 19th through May 24th.

In Entering the Healing Ground¸ author and soul activist Francis Weller, offers a new vision of grief and sorrow. He reveals the hidden vitality in grief, uncovered when the heart welcomes the sorrows of our life and those of the world. We are ripened in times of loss, made more human by the rites of grief. Through story, poetry and insightful reflections, Francis offers a meditation on the healing power of grief. Kinshasha hosts a powerful conversation that you do not want to miss.
Health Notes Airs Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

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Gina Miranda Kingsley is a Meso-American Mayan Time Keeper.

Gina is an expert on the Mayan Calendar a 5,000 year old vehicle of predictions and spirituality. The Mayan calendar is an ancient device filled with secret codes. Ancient Mayans were not only mystics, but they were scientists that delved into the origins of life.
Gina Miranda Kingsley is a scientist that studies and tracks the calendars to look for the secret codes within. Her website explores and reveals the complexities hidden within the calendar. She discusses such topics as: What are the Maya; Heroic Feminine Values; How Your Birthdate Effects Your life; Mayan Spiritual Manifestations during Ceremonies

Health Notes airs Mondays 6:30-7:30PM

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Health Notes will end its African History Month tribute by talking with teacher, mentor and founder of WE WIN Institute.

Titilayo Bediako was born and raised in Minnesota, and is the daughter of civil rights leader Matthew Little. She is instrumental in using African and African American history to African American youth through WE WIN Institute ( a non-profit organization dedicated to the academic and social success of all children)

Bediako says participating in African rituals helps give African-American youth a sense that they belong to something larger than themselves or their surroundings.

She says that’s something she never received when she was in school. After graduating from high school, she moved to Tennessee where she joined an African history study group. “The more I studied and the more I learned about myself, the more my given name, which was Michelle Little, didn’t fit the person I had become,” says Bediako.
The name Titilayo is from the Yoruba of Nigeria. She says it means “everlasting happiness.” Bediako is from the Ashanti people of Ghana and it means, “born to struggle for her people.”

Symbols of Kwanzaa, celebrated by African-Americans in December. Participating in African-rooted rituals and ceremonies, like Kwanzaa, is one way African-Americans nurture their African side. “So I get everlasting happiness in struggling for my people,” says Bediako. “The one thing that I’ve learned is that struggling for African people makes it possible to struggle for all people.”

Like Bediako, many African-Americans have adopted African names. However, despite attempts to identify with Africans, African-Americans carry the physical and emotional baggage of slavery and racism. Bediako says many African-Americans have poor self-esteem because they were born in a country that historically has devalued their lives.

.Health Notes Airs Mondays from 6:30-7:30PM

Caribbean born, gay singer/songwriter Nhojj talks about his new CD “Made to Love Him – Celebrating Love” and Rob Ainsley, Head of Music with the MN Opera discusses “The Dream of Valentino”, Dominick Argento’s opera about 1920’s film star Rudolph Valentino

Born in 1931, Josie Robinson Johnson has played an active role in the civil rights movement since her teenage years, when she and her father canvassed her hometown of Houston to gather signatures on an anti-poll tax petition.

In the early 1960s, Johnson lobbied professionally for passage of bills concerning such issues as fair housing and employment opportunities. In 1964, she traveled from Minneapolis to Mississippi with an integrated group of women to witness and take part in the struggle there. After visiting an open-air freedom school where blacks were organizing, the group learned the school was bombed later that day. Johnson became a community organizer for Project ENABLE, a pioneering effort in developing parenting skills and strengthening family life in 1965. A member of the Minneapolis Urban League, she served as acting director between 1967 and 1968.

Johnson worked with elected officials many times over the years. In 1968, she became a legislative liaison and community liaison as a mayoral aide in Minneapolis during a time of trouble for African Americans in the town. The executive assistant to the lieutenant governor of Colorado from 1975 to 1978, Johnson went back to Texas in 1978 and supervised Judson Robinson’s campaign staff. In 1980, she served as deputy campaign manager for the Jimmy Carter presidential campaign in Tennessee.

Johnson has also had an ongoing relationship with the University of Minnesota. Between 1971 and 1973, she served on the University’s Board of Regents. She earned a B.A. in Sociology at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, and an M.A. and Ed.D. at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. The University of Minnesota offered her a senior fellowship in 1987. Johnson directed its All-University Forum as diversity director from 1990 to 1992. That year, she became responsible for minority affairs and diversity at the college as the associate vice president for academic affairs. The University of Minnesota established the annual Josie Robinson Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award in her honor.

Don’t miss this important conversation with this African American Icon. Health Notes Airs Mondays, 6:30-7:30pm

Born in 1931, Josie Robinson Johnson has played an active role in the civil rights movement since her teenage years, when she and her father canvassed her hometown of Houston to gather signatures on an anti-poll tax petition.

In the early 1960s, Johnson lobbied professionally for passage of bills concerning such issues as fair housing and employment opportunities. In 1964, she traveled from Minneapolis to Mississippi with an integrated group of women to witness and take part in the struggle there. After visiting an open-air freedom school where blacks were organizing, the group learned the school was bombed later that day. Johnson became a community organizer for Project ENABLE, a pioneering effort in developing parenting skills and strengthening family life in 1965. A member of the Minneapolis Urban League, she served as acting director between 1967 and 1968.

Johnson worked with elected officials many times over the years. In 1968, she became a legislative liaison and community liaison as a mayoral aide in Minneapolis during a time of trouble for African Americans in the town. The executive assistant to the lieutenant governor of Colorado from 1975 to 1978, Johnson went back to Texas in 1978 and supervised Judson Robinson’s campaign staff. In 1980, she served as deputy campaign manager for the Jimmy Carter presidential campaign in Tennessee.

Johnson has also had an ongoing relationship with the University of Minnesota. Between 1971 and 1973, she served on the University’s Board of Regents. She earned a B.A. in Sociology at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, and an M.A. and Ed.D. at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. The University of Minnesota offered her a senior fellowship in 1987. Johnson directed its All-University Forum as diversity director from 1990 to 1992. That year, she became responsible for minority affairs and diversity at the college as the associate vice president for academic affairs. The University of Minnesota established the annual Josie Robinson Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award in her honor.

Don’t miss this important conversation with this African American Icon. Health Notes Airs Mondays, 6:30-7:30pm

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