Arts & Culture

The Brass Messengers with the Yale Women’s Slavic Chorus

This “Live from Minnesota” segment features the Brass Messengers—a Twin Cities’ band that formed from the Heart of the Beast May Day parade. With Caribbean and Balkan influences, the Brass Messengers describe themselves as, “a sprawling fun factory of musicians.” This show was recorded at the Ritz Theater in Minneapolis on March 12, 2012, and features contributions from the Yale Women’s Slavic Chorus. For more information on the Brass Messengers, visit brassmessengers.com. Produced for KFAI by Daniel Zamzow.

THE CONTENDERS, Pt. 1
Victoria Woodhull, William Jennings Bryan, & Adlai Stevenson by Radio Diaries

Opening with a reggae-flava set… adding more tastes of Lila Downs, performing this evening at the Ordway in St. Paul. Touching down in Brazil and reviewing African songbird, Dobet Gnahore’ in review of her visit this week at the Dakota.

Kicking things off tonight with McPullish’s excellent new “Black Metal White Reggae” album (Charlie’s Records); followed by the latest Vibronics & friends on SCOOPs Records; King Django & Victor Rice with “Dub Discoveries From Version City” (celebrating 20 years of Stubborn Records); and the “Lost Album” unearthed and released by Groove Corp. Also tonight we did an Easy Star All Stars set to celebrate their “Thrillah” tour (and my trip to Chicago to see them). More great new stuff from Tafari, Beats Antique, Kukan dub Lagan, The Dynamics, The Dubsmith, Victoria Moralez, Damo Naimad, The Vibraphonic Orchestra, and Dada Afrik & Calcia.

We speak with Sheila O'Connor about her new novel for young people Keeping Safe the Stars. She is also the author of Where No Gods Came, which won the Minnesota Book Award and the Michigan Award for Literary Fiction, and was selected as a Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers title.

News Host: Terry Carter
Music Hosts: Ron Thums and Jean Silverberg (former hosts of KFAI’s Radio Rumpus Room)
Producer: Dale Connelly

Third Home from Burma: Minnesota’s Karen Community
Produced by Marisa Helms

The fastest-growing refugee community in Minnesota over the past few years is a population from Southeast Asia most Minnesotans have never heard of—the Karen (pronounced Kuh-RENN). The nearly 7,000 Karen living here, mostly on the east side of St. Paul, have kept a low profile since they first started arriving in 2000. Their journey to Minnesota has been long and difficult. The Karen are an oppressed ethnic minority from Burma, the country also known as Myanmar, and for more than 60 years, innocent Karen men, women and children have become displaced by violence and civil war. Like many refugees who come to Minnesota, the Karen are here because they want to be safe and free from persecution. Most importantly, they want to give their children a better life and a good education. As producer Marisa Helms reports in this MinneCulture audio documentary, the story of the Karen is about resilience and the survival of a community and culture. Here in Minnesota, the Karen have found refuge, and finally, hope for the future.

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