Roots

Five stories from KFAI’s 10,000 Fresh Voices series:

1. Pavec Museum of Broadcasting
Produced by Britt Aamodt
Salesman Joe Pavek had a dream: to create a broadcasting museum. That dream became a reality in 1988, when the Pavek Museum of Broadcasting opened in St. Louis Park. KFAI producer Britt Aamodt toured this internationally recognized museum with director Steve Raymer.

2. Mixed Blood Theatre’s 55454 Series
Produced by Allison Herrera
Mixed Blood Theater is deepening its work in the Cedar Riverside neighborhood. New programs like Arts Neighborhood Cedar Riverside, the 55454 series, and Voices of Cedar Riverside are aimed at welcoming the people who live in the West Bank and near Mixed Blood, which has been around for 35 years.

3. Trylon Microcinema
Produced by Cyn Collins
Operated by Take-Up Productions, the Trylon is the Twin Cities first microcinema. Tucked behind the X,Y and Z gallery on Minnehaha Avenue in Minneapolis, this classic movie house seats 50 and uses Century 35mm projectors for its films, which include not only classics, but indie and cult films. Take-Up sponsors screenings at the Trylon and other independent movie theaters, including the Heights, the Riverview and Bell Auditorium. KFAI producer Cyn Collins talked to Barry Kryshka and Peter Schilling about the Trylon, Take-Up’s community collaborations, and the upcoming spring and summer series. For more information, visit take-up.org.

4. Nimbus Theatre
Produced by Michelle Bruch
Long intro for web: A nomadic theater company called Nimbus is putting down roots and building a new performance theater from scratch in an old Northeast Minneapolis warehouse. After renting stages for 10 years, the staff at Nimbus decided it was time to find a home where they could connect with a community, achieve more flexibility for their experimental work, and provide space for other traveling theater groups. Located in the heart of the city’s arts district at 1517 Central Ave. NE, the theater has been met with a flood of volunteers and community support. KFAI’s Michelle Bruch interviews the artistic directors.

5. Dr. Sketchy’s Anti Art School
Produced by Nancy Sartor
The international phenomenon known as Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School is a figure drawing session with burlesque and performance artists as models. What began in 2005 in Brooklyn as an alternative to traditional co-ops, has spread to 100 locations around the world. In Minneapolis, the two-hour drinking and drawing session takes place the fourth Sunday of every month at the 331 Club, and features irreverent drawing contests with prizes from local retailers. In this story meet host and producer Ophelia Flame, model and burlesque performer Queenie von Curves, and participating artists. Sunday, March 27, is the third anniversary of Dr. Skethcy’s Twin Cities. For more information, visit Dr. Sketchy’s Twin Cities on facebook or go to drsketchy.com.

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During the first hour we listened to music celebration Iranian New Year, which begins today. We also had an interview with Irish accordion master Paddy O’Brien about his group Chulrua.

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For today’s show, we included a tribute to Ferlin Husky. Mr. Husky passed away March 17th at the age of 85. The tribute is during the second hour of the program.

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Hallelujah, Brothers and Sisters!  It's the Black Church Service!

Wilbur B. Foshay: The Man & His Tower
Produced by Britt Aamodt

It was called the Tower. It didn’t need another name. The Foshay Tower, at its founding in 1929 and for nearly a half a century, reigned as the tallest building in Minneapolis. Though the Tower sank into a period of gentle neglect, it was revitalized in 2008 as the upscale W. Hotel-Minneapolis. The same cannot be said for the Tower’s builder, Wilbur B. Foshay, whose comet-like rise as a powerful Midwestern utilities magnate was embodied in the obelisk structure. Just two months after the Tower’s dedication, on October 29, 1929, Wilbur Foshay lost everything in the Stock Market Crash, save for his his reputation. That, however, was defamed in 1931, when he stood trial for mail fraud, in what was largely a Ponzi scheme.

Wilbur B. Foshay: The Man & His Tower, Part I

In Part I of this two-part documentary, Foshay: The Man and His Tower, KFAI producer Britt Aamodt explores the meteoric rise of the WB Foshay utilities empire, which at one time stretched from Minnesota to Central America. Combining interviews, historical research and Wilbur Foshay’s own words, Aamodt paints a portrait of an era rash big dreams, economic speculation, and a bigger fall—telling the tale of how the Great Depression stripped Wilbur Foshay of his empire.

Wilbur B. Foshay: The Man & His Tower, Part II

In Part II of this documentary, Foshay: The Man and His Tower, KFAI producer Britt Aamodt takes up the narrative of Wilbur Foshay, examining his luxurious Minneapolis lifestyle—the houses, the gold faucets in the Tower offices—and how this bumptious businessman picked himself up after the Crash of 1929, only to receive word that he was being indicted for mail fraud. One of the biggest trials of the day took place in Minneapolis, sending Foshay to Leavenworth Prison, and a Minnesota family to their deaths, in the fallout from the trial. Aamodt follows Foshay after his release from prison, when the man who built the Tower sought to rebuild his life in small-town Colorado.

Listen to the entire documentary at ampers.org

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