World Music

Jamaica became an independent country in 1962 and for the past 50 years has been an international musical powerhouse, moving from ska to rock steady to reggae, roots and dancehall and beyond. General Moses (Legends of Ska) joined Brad Wrolstad on this week’s African Rhythms for a two hour survey of the evolution of Jamaican music featuring cuts from Prince Buster, Derrick Morgan, Alton Ellis, The Ethiopians, Desmond Dekker, Freddie McGregor, Black Uhuru, Jacob Miller and a host of others.

Some of Paco’s most virtuosic flamenco playing, and some amazing inside information from Susana di Palma on the feat of finally getting Zorro onto the stage.

This week we have DJs Miguel Vargas, Terrell Lamar, and birthday spoken word artist, Rodrigo Sanchez Chavarria…

Live from Minnesota presents…

Toki Wright’s FADERS mixtape release at the Fine Line
Produced by Peter Frey

Tonight the Echo Chamber presented the annual “Word Beat I Powa” dub poetry, other poetry, and spoken word special as part of National Poetry Month. Of course, it was dub poetry that set the foundation of the show. Among the dub poets featured were Oku Onoura, Mutabaruka, Ras Takura, Jean Binta Breeze, Benjamin Zephaniah, Tomlin Ellis, Malachi Smith, Glenville Bryan, Jazzmin Tutum, Lillian Allen, Desmond Faada Johnson, Lady Dawn, and of course, the incomparable Linton Kwesi Johnson. Other pieces of dub poetry included the excellent track “Dilly Dally” from Everton Sylvester and the Brooklyn Funk Essentials, and “Spirit Made Flesh” from Dub Gabriel and Karen Gibson. But there was much more than dub poetry… From the Beat camp we had Jack Kerouac, and The Last Poets contributed the gritty “True Blues”. Other voices included Jah Wobble and Ronnie Drew doing “London Rain” from the “Celtic Poets” album; Ken Nordine’s unique “word jazz’; the “Hashish Poem” from Bill Laswell and Nicole Blackman; and the powerful words and music of Liberian born (and KFAI’s own) poet, e.g. bailey. Ahh, but let us not forget the extraordinary Jamaican DJs. Before there was dub poetry as we know it today, there was already the great tradition of Jamaican “toasters” — and we included King Stitt and I-Roy. Heck, we even included some classic Stiller & Meara comedy, and “Jack the Biscuit” from late Andy Fairley. What an eclectic mix of words…and beats…and Powa!


Tonight our guest is Dr. Eugene Rousseau, Emeritus Professeur at Indiana, who is currently teaching saxophone at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Rousseau was a Fulbright fellow who studied classical saxophone at the Paris Conservatory with the famous Marcel Mule. We will play several of his classical recordings along with the interview.

During the second hour, we will hear a variety of songs, both old and new, from France and Québec.


Spring brings violins, harps, & accordians!

Guest Host: J. Otis Powell!

Pages