MinneCulture

MinneCulture programs are part of KFAI's Legacy Project, which highlights Minnesota arts, culture, history and the environment. MinneCulture airs every Wednesday evening from 7:30 to 8pm. The program features short stories from our 10,000 Fresh Voices series, audio documentaries, and live local performances.

KFAI is part of the AMPERS/IPR network (Association of Minnesota Public Educational Radio Stations/Independent Public Radio).

All MinneCulture programs are uploaded to ampers.org.

Funding for MinneCulture comes from KFAI listeners, and the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.


Recent Playlists

4/16/2014 MinneCulture

Rhizosphere at Black Dog Cafe
Produced by Daniel Zamzow

Tonight’s program features Rhizosphere—an improve quintet featuring Mike Bruns on electric guitar; Sean Egan on clarinet and bass clarinet; Bobb Fantauzzo on Native American and Chinese flutes, percussion, and vocals; Dan Lange on drums; and Gabriela Sweet on slide guitar, accordion, and vocals.

4/9/2014 MinneCulture

Spring Pledge drive continues, with more features from 10,000 Fresh Voices.

1. Chimgee’s Mission / Produced by Diane Richard
Erdenechimeg “Chimgee” Haltarhuu is a Mongolian circus performer and crusader against domestic abuse. She teaches full-time at Circus Juventas, in St. Paul. With her Mission Manduhai initiative, she takes her troupe, Circus Manduhai, to rural Mongolia, where she educates circus-goers about the dangers of violence in the home. As World Circus Day and the 20th anniversary of Circus Juventas approach in April, she speaks with KFAI reporter Diane Richard about the dueling passions that animate her life.

2. The Minneapolis Art Lending Library / Produced by Britta Greene
The Minneapolis Art Lending Library (MALL) allows patrons to borrow artwork for two months at a time. Started by three recent college grads, the project recently received a grant from the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council. With the money, the library will move to a new space, build its collection and—the founders hope—reach out to more community members.

3. Sulfates and Minnesota’s Wild Rice / Produced by Kelly Schoenfeld
For more than three years, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency has studying the water quality standard for Minnesota wild rice. In this feature, producer Kelly Schoenfelder learns about the results.

4/2/2014 MinneCulture

Spring Pledge Drive beings! Tonight MinneCulture features three shorts from our 10,000 Fresh Voices series:

1. The sisterhood of the traveling scarves / Dylan Peers McCoy
Tucked away on the second floor of the African Development Center in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis, is a tiny thrift shop called the Sisterhood Boutique. The shop is a dream come true for the founders—a group of young East African women who call themselves the Sisterhood of the Traveling Scarves. After meeting and planning for nearly two years at the Brian Coyle Community Center, the high school entrepreneurs opened their store in February 2014.

2. Family’s artistic creativity spans multiple generations / Manda Lillie
The sudden and dramatic regression of Monica Moses’ development in the early years of her life alarmed her mother and grandmother. They watched as the toddler lost her ability to talk, walk and make eye contact. They sought help, and when Monica was diagnosed with Autism, they moved forward with treatment and therapy. Today Monica is a happy 17-year-old and part of a multi-talented, multi-generational family who share creative genes in the visual and literary arts.

3. Abdi Elmi’s unique distinction / Britta Greene
Abdi Elmi is the only court-certified Somali interpreter in the country. He lives here in Minnesota, home to the largest Somali population in the United States, and he—unsurprisingly—keeps a full caseload. KFAI producer Britta Greene brings us this story about Abdi Elmi and the challenges of interpreting at the highest levels.

3/26/2014 MinneCulture

Chastity Brown performs at the Cedar Cultural Center. For more information, visit her website.

3/19/2014 MinneCulture

Circle of the Witch
Produced by Andy Driscoll & Tom O’Connell

Circle of the Witch was a nonprofit theater company that formed in 1973. For five years it functioned as a political performance group, exploring the relationship between theater and feminism. This audio documentary was produced for KFAI by Andy Driscoll and Tom O’Connell. For more information on Circle of the Witch, visit the Minnesota Historical Society.

3/12/2014 MinneCulture

MinneCulture celebrates International Women’s Day with special documentaries during the month of March. Tonight it’s an encore performance of Charlotte Ouisconsin Clark Van Cleve, produced by Bobbie Scott.

Charlotte Ouisconsin Clark Van Cleve was a remarkable woman who left a legacy in Minnesota. A newborn Charlotte arrived here in 1819, when her father landed with the Fifth Infantry to construct Fort Snelling. Spending her formative years at remote military posts instilled in Charlotte a love of the flag, and throughout her life she exemplified strong patriotism and an altruistic nature. She raised a large family, and after the Civil War, founded Bethany Home—a safe-haven for “fallen” girls and women. Charlotte served tirelessly as the president of Bethany Home for more than twenty years, often taking unpopular stands in support of those she called her “girls.” Despite her sometimes controversial opinions, Charlotte was a beloved and respected member of the community throughout her long life. This MinneCulture documentary was produced by Bobbie Scott, with production assistance by Nancy Sartor. Special thanks to Sabrina Crews, Lisa Day, Ron Grogg, Christine and Jeff Nordin, and the Historic Fort Snelling Fife and Drum Corps.

3/5/2014 MinneCulture

KFAI celebrates exceptional women during the month of March in recognition of International Women’s Day. Tonight, MinneCulture presents an audio documentary entitled Rosalie Wahl: Minnesota’s first female Supreme Court Justice.

In 1977, the Women’s Movement scored a major victory with Roe v. Wade, but Congress failed to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. In Minnesota, a pro-life Catholic governor and a public defender, poet and mother of four would make state history when Rudy Perpich appointed Rosalie Wahl as Minnesota’s first female Supreme Court Justice. Britt Aamodt examines one of Minnesota’s most significant heroes in women’s history. Featuring Lori Sturdevant, author of “Her Honor: Rosalie Wahl & the Minnesota Women’s Movement,” and Betty Wilson, author of “Rudy! The People’s Governor.”

2/26/2014 MinneCulture

Peggy’s Dreams: Living life with Down syndrome
Produced by Marisa Helms

Peggy Mehen wants to make some changes in her life. She wants a new job. She wants to live independently. And her biggest dream is to be a supermodel. The fact that Peggy is a 40 year-old woman with Down syndrome has little impact on what she believes she can achieve. As a child growing up in the 1970s and ’80s, Peggy belongs to a first generation of children with Down syndrome to be mainstreamed into schools—paving the way for today’s generation of parents and people with Down syndrome who continue to push boundaries and demand greater inclusion and better social and medical supports in the community.

Peggy’s Dreams: Living life with Down syndrome, was produced by Marisa Helms (marisahelms.com). Producer’s Note: The 1952 educational film heard in my story, In Our Care: Woodward State Hospital and School, is part of a 13-week series of documentaries about Iowa’s state institutions. The entire In our Care series is archived online at the Minnesota Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities website (mn.gov/mnddc).

2/19/2014 MinneCulture

Celebrating the Rondo neighborhood
Produced by Allison Herrera
Production assistance by Stuart Rosen

St. Paul’s oldest African-American neighborhood is named after French Canadian fur trader Joseph Rondeau. After the civil war and during the reconstruction period in the south, many African Americans sought a better life and moved north. Some arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota, where jobs in the railroad and lumber industries were plentiful. Starting a new life on Rondo Avenue, residents became entrepreneurs, opening businesses and catering to the local community. Bonds were formed and friendships developed. A tight-knit neighborhood of people committed to education and opportunity evolved. Families looked out for one another.

Then in the 1960s, construction of Interstate 94 divided Rondo—shattering the community and displacing thousands of African Americans into a racially segregated city and discriminatory housing market. It radically changed the landscape, and erased a now-legendary neighborhood. Rondo still exists and its persistence and growth are celebrated through events like Rondo Days and the Jazz Festival. This audio documentary was produced by Allison Herrera with production assistance by Stuart Rosen.

2/12/2014 MinneCulture

Dora Zaidenweber at Transfer of Memory
Produced by Tom Garneau

Earlier this year, KFAI, the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas and Bethel University partnered to present a special community engagement forum around Transfer of Memory photo exhibit of Holocaust survivors by David Sherman.

On January 22, a special reception was held at Bethel, featuring survivor Dora Zaidenweber. Ms. Zaidenweber recounted stories from her family history and discussed translating her father’s memoir, “Sky Tinged Red,” from Yiddish to English.

The event was part of What’s in the Mix—a series of community engagement forums made possible by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. It was recorded and produced for broadcast by Tom Garneau, and airs Wed, February 12, at 7:30pm, on MinneCulture.

Transfer of Memory is a traveling exhibit. It will be on display at the Otter Tail Historical Society in Fergus Falls, Minnesota, from February 18 through March 28.