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KFAI has been on the air for 39 years, and your involvement makes all the difference.

It's time to make a contribution online.  Thanks for supporting Fresh Air Community Radio! 

Contribute Now!

KFAI has been on the air for 39 years, and your involvement makes all the difference.

It's time to make a contribution online.  Thanks for supporting Fresh Air Community Radio! 

February Is Black History Month On KFAI

Feb 19 2018

KFAI’s Black History Month programming in 2018 takes place across the schedule and throughout the month of February.  Check this space to find out what’s in the archive as our schedule unfolds.

Next upCountry Pride with host Roderic Southall

Thursday, February 22nd, 2pm to 4pm

 

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Feb. 19th Titilayo Bediako - The Importance of History and Ritual on Health Notes

Feb 19 2018

Health Notes will be in conversation with teacher, mentor and founder of WE WIN Institute Titilayo Bediako.

Titilayo Bediako was born and raised in Minnesota, and is the daughter of civil rights leader Matthew Little. She is instrumental in using African and African American history
to African American youth through WE WIN Institute ( a non-profit organization dedicated to the academic and social success of all children)

Titilayo says participating in African rituals helps give African-American youth a sense that they belong to something larger than themselves or their surroundings.
She says that’s something she never received when she was in school. After graduating from high school, she moved to Tennessee where she joined an African history study group. “The more I studied and the more I learned about myself, the more my given name, which was Michelle Little, didn’t fit the person I had become,” The name Titilayo is from the Yoruba of Nigeria. She says it means “everlasting happiness.” Bediako is from the Ashanti people of Ghana and it means, “born to struggle for her people.”
Participating in African-rooted rituals and ceremonies, like Kwanzaa, is one way African-Americans nurture their African side. “So I get everlasting happiness in struggling for my people,” says Bediako. “The one thing that I’ve learned is that struggling for African people makes it possible to struggle for all people.”

Many African-Americans have adopted African names. Despite attempts to identify with Africans, African-Americans carry the physical and emotional baggage of slavery and racism.
Titilayo says many African-Americans have poor self-esteem because they were born in a country that historically has devalued their lives.
This is an important conversation you will not want to miss.

Health Notes Airs Mondays 7:00-8:00PM

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Feb 12th Lissa Jones - KMOJ Radio's Host of Urban Agenda - Black History on Health Notes

Feb 12 2018

Lissa Jones is the outspoken articulate host of KMOJ’s (89.9 FM) Urban Agenda. Urban Agenda investigates the impact that beliefs and values held around ‘race’, place, class, identity, orientation, gender, faith, and occupation (vocation) impact the behavior of individuals, groups and structures within organizations.

“This is equity: just and fair inclusion into a society in which all can participate, prosper, and reach their full potential. Unlocking the promise of the nation by unleashing the promise in us all.” –

Lissa will be sharing her enthusiasm knowledge and love of Black history with Health Notes

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